State Library of Victoria \ Inside a dog
Skip to main content

residence

Apr 14,2014

File 20563

Out there in the big, bad world of moviemaking, no one will read your script unless it looks like a script. There are some pretty strict rules on how a script should be formatted, how the dialogue and action description should look, and screenwriters ignore them at their peril.

Read more

Apr 10,2014

File 20476

What's your favourite movie based on a Young Adult novel? The Book Thief? The Harry Potters? The Hunger Games? Tomorrow When the War Began? 

Read more

Apr 01,2014

This month on Inside a Dog, I want you to help me write and develop a movie.

Read more

Mar 31,2014

Dear Readers of this Blog, 

This is my final post here at Inside A Dog.  Thanks for having me.  It’s been great!  I’ll miss you.  

(The next blogger is Tristan Bancks, and i wish him a warm welcome.)

Read more

Mar 28,2014

A long time ago, I did a Masters in Law at Yale. 

On my first day, I made a new friend.  We went to get a coffee, and she said this to me:

‘I am very intelligent.’ 

She emphasised each word.  If I’d known the direction that punctuation would eventually take, I’d have realised that what she actually said was this: 

Read more

Mar 25,2014

Dear Readers of this Blog,

Hello.  How are things?

I am writing to remind you of the competition, and to tell you about my trip to Alaska.

Read more

Mar 22,2014

1. After taking Charlie to school, I went to the supermarket to buy lettuce and bread.  Chocolate was on sale, so I got a couple.  

 

File 19966 

 

2. I saw that it should be Chocolate Day.  I bought a chocolate rabbit to spend Chocolate Day with me.  Next, I went to Kirribilli and worked in the Chocolate Cafe.  

File 19942

 

Read more

Mar 19,2014

Last time I was here, in 2008, I wrote a post with the title ‘Outside, A Dog’.  

Underneath the title I wrote one line: ‘When will the dog next door stop barking?  When?’

Read more

Mar 16,2014

Eavesdropping is a good word.  What happened was, houses had eaves, and water spilled over the edges of the eaves and dripped to the ground below.  So they called the dripping water 'the eavesdrip', and the place where the water fell, 'the eavesdrop' (but they were relaxed about words in those days, so they mixed these up).  A person who stood on the eavesdrop, and listened to conversations taking place inside the house, became known as 'an eavesdropper'. 

Read more